Category: Health

All the best ideas come from the big centers, right? Not always, if you believe what you read in Innovation Trickles in a New Direction published on Businessweek.com on March 11. In this article, Reena Jana turns conventional thinking about innovation on its head by describing products developed in third world or remote countries by the likes of General Electric, Microsoft, Nokia, Proctor and Gamble, and the like, that have found their way into wide application in the industrialized world. This must mean something about where and how to look for innovation in health care.

Health

We’re over the hill, our hair is greying (if it’s even there at all), our joints are aching, our skin is sagging, and there’s not really anything we can do to stop it. Our bodies all age, leaving us wishing for the energy and vitality of the youth we once had. So instead of moping about, yearning for days gone by, let’s use this new year as an opportunity to start a new outlook.

Let’s resolve to have a healthier, happier soul. After all, there’s no sense in spending the last years of your life in a melancholy, negative state of mind when you could just as easily find your inner child and live the rest of your life to the fullest. But how?

Health

In a July 27 feature, Business Week, published a profile of Honda’s new CEO, Takanobu Ito. The spin in Honda’s New CEO Is Also Chief Innovator by Reena Jana and Ian Rowley is an examination of the value and wisdom of appointing an “in the trenches” engineer (Ito is also Honda’s Director of Research and Development) to the chief executive post, thereby combining the company’s leadership accountability for innovation and business success. It struck me that healthcare organizations face similar questions when considering whether or not to place clinicians in top executive management positions. So read the article and think about the issues it raises.

Health

One of the opportunities in a down economy – if you are not too down yourself of course – is the potential to pick up some bargains. Which is not without its rewards – and its hazards. The April 3 issue of Business Week features How to Make Acquisitions in a Down Economy as the cover article in the Small Biz section. In this article, Amy S. Choi passes on some wisdom and experience which can be useful to healthcare leaders as they consider purchases – be they physician practice acquisitions, hospital or clinic takeovers, or purchases of healthcare-related businesses.

Health

Gen X Takes Over, the January 13, 2018 article by Tammy Erikson on BusinessWeek.com (actually a prequel of her longer case study in February’s Harvard Business Review) nominally comments on the Gen-X (Obama post-Bush and Clinton) takeover. But it’s mostly about the emerging generational inversion in the business world. And since it is about business leaders, in the world of the Health Care Leadership Blog it’s fair game to consider the ramification of this phenomenon for healthcare leaders. So check it out, as well as it’s more complete cousin, the HBR case study.

Health

For the first time in a while I spent fully half the weekend NOT working at anything but my embarrassing golf game and some online sleuthing into what I am convinced is a foolish “can’t lose” medical device investment that a friend is trying to get me to participate in (before the greedy people grab the opportunity). So when I finally picked up Friday’s (August 14) Wall Street Journal print edition on Saturday night and was immediately drawn to the front page feature: Flying Low Is Flying High As Demand for Crop-Dusters Soars, I wasn’t sure what instinct was drawing me to relate it to the experience of healthcare leaders. Well the 24 online comments as of this writing, all by and about the “ag pilots” celebrated in this article, revealed no health care gadflies leaping to make the connection. So here goes…

Health

McDonalds Seeks Way to Keep Sizzling which appeared in the March 10, 2009 Wall Street Journal is a pretty standard business press article which is nominally about how the “golden arches” has remained profitable during the recession – but it reads like an instructional manual in effective management style for any industry (yes, health care is an industry) in any economy. If Janet Adamy’s characterization of McDonald’s President and COO Ralph Alvarez is anywhere near on the mark, health care leaders have plenty to emulate in his leadership methods and style. This is another of those often published corporate snapshots that I suspect are not on the daily “must read” list for most busy health care leaders. Hence the mission of this blog – to “push” it out to you. And your reciprocal response – to take a few minutes to read it. Here’s why….

Health

Can Health Care Informatics Capture Human Health Care Information?

Taking this in another direction, consider the following. I’ve been working with a client to enhance physician adoption of EMR at a large southwestern medical center. One of the areas the docs are hung up on is the transition to electronic clinical documentation. They’re mostly OK with CPOE. But many are concerned that using e-tools and scripts to document clinical histories and to communicate complex treatment plans sacrifices some of the art and nuance of telling the story – which are better expressed in a narrative history and physical or consultation note – in favor of capturing the “provable facts” which are essentially the data elements EMRs demand.

Health

A Scion Drives Toyota Back to Basics, in the Management section of yesterday’s Wall Street Journal chronicles the factors that earlier this year led to the appointment of Akio Toyoda, grandson of the company’s founder, as Toyota’s next President. What’s provocative about this, other than the potential intrigue of nepotism which always draws reader interest, is the “back to basics” subtheme which may bear examination for healthcare leaders as well.

Health